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Review and critique the postings of two peers. Share an insight you gained regarding qualitative analysis by reviewing the post. Contrast your understanding of qualitative theories with the ideas presented in your peers’ postings.

 

This article reports the work of a native social work researcher who conducted an ethnographic study with her social identity group. The complex and inherent challenges of being both an insider with intimate knowledge of one’s study population and an outsider as a researcher are explored. Implications for social work research and practice with regard to native social work perspectives and methods for reflecting on one’s own process of becoming familiar and for gaining insights into the field of under study.

One outcome of these analyses about how and by whom research projects are carried out is the emergence of “native,” “indigenous,” or “insider” research in which scholars conduct studies with populations and communities and identify groups of which they are also members. This article is an account and analysis of the researcher’s role vis-a-vis the research project based on my dissertation research. In particular, I discuss the roles and challenges of “insider,” indigenous,” or “native” research, which refers to conducting research with communities or identity groups of which one is a member (Hayano, 1979; Jones, 1970; Messerschmidt, 1981; Narayan, 1993; Ohnuki-Tierney, 1984; Reed-Danahay, 1997).

The once unchallenged predominance of a particular race, gender, and class analysis of our social and economic lives became the complex and sometimes elusive target of our collective reforms. Where historically social scientists were supposed to be objectively removed from even their own “gaze” on the research project, theorists such as Minh-Ha (1989), Harding (1987), and Rosaldo (1989) challenged the essential nature of the researcher-subject dichotomy, daring us instead to “walk the hyphens of the Self and Other” (Fine, 1992

Reference:

Reference:  Jacob, M. (2006). When a native “goes researcher”: Notes from the north American indigenous games. The American Behavioral Scientist. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, Inc.